MARK your Calendars !! The 2nd SMOS SCIENCE CONFERENCE (25-29 May 2015) and the SMOS TRAINING COURSE (18-22 May 2015) will take place at ESA-ESAC, near Madrid (Spain). For further information on both events please see www.smos2015.info The deadline for submission of abstracts for the SMOS science conference and applications for the SMOS training course is 16 January 2015. The 2nd...

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New data, old features to re-consider… posted by Christophe MAES Signature of the equatorial upwelling conditions in the Pacific Ocean in terms of SSS (as shown larger than 34.8) in conjunction of SST (black thick line represents the 28°C isotherm, ci=1°C) and of density (blue thick line represents the 22.5 kg/m3 isolign, ci=0.5) as derived from the SMOS satellite mission. A salient feature of the present-day...

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Towards a Flood risk alert system with SMOS? SMOS gives almost real time information on soil moisture. At CESBIO / CATDS we had the idea to investigate with Capgemini how such a piece of crucial information could be used to anticipate flood risks. Using the Capgemini "Rodger" platform, we merged SMOS historical records of Soil Moisture, SMOS actual surface soil moisture information and rainfall forecasts to build...

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5 years ago today .... ... The first SMOS Image was acquired ... and processed giving some (strange) soil moisture estimates but proving that the whole concept worked, including image reconstruction! A lot a progresses have been made since so a big thanks to all of you who contributed to this huge success! Yann for the whole SMOS gang from all over the globe (including the retired and...

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LEWIS on the move: Part 2 As posted last June our good old faithful LEWIS (Lemaitre et al, 2004) after spending 9 years in SMOSREX near Toulouse underwent maintenance and updating and was moved to Saint Hilaire du Touvet  near Grenoble by François Lemaître and Arnaud Mialon. The road trip was arduous as LEWIS is not small to say the least while it is "a long and winding road" to the top... Once...

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MARK your Calendars !!

Category : CATDS, Cal/Val, Data, L1, L2, L3, L4, Model, Ocean, Satellite, Training

The 2nd SMOS SCIENCE CONFERENCE (25-29 May 2015) and the SMOS TRAINING COURSE (18-22 May 2015) will take place at ESA-ESAC, near Madrid (Spain).

For further information on both events please see www.smos2015.info

The deadline for submission of abstracts for the SMOS science conference and applications for the SMOS training course is 16 January 2015.

The 2nd SMOS Science Conference will be jointly organised by ESA, CNES and SMOS-MODE.

By 2015, the SMOS mission will have been in orbit for more than five years, providing a continuous stream of high quality data products. Being a water cycle mission, SMOS observations have been used by rather distinct science communities addressing oceanography, land surface hydrology, and meteorology over a wide range of applications. The focus of this conference will deviate from previous events in that the emphasis will be on applications of SMOS data, including operational services, the development of novel data products, the synergistic use of SMOS data with other data sources and the potential of SMOS data for the generation of long-term data sets. The workshop will also cover common themes such as the quality of the Level 1 data products and calibration and validation activities.

The 2nd SMOS Science Conference will be preceded by a SMOS Training Course on 18-22 May 2015, organised by CESBIO and held as well at the ESA-ESAC premises near Madrid. The course will provide an opportunity to learn how to work with level 1 (brightness temperature) and level 2 (soil moisture and ocean salinity) data provided by the SMOS mission. The deadline for applications is 16 January. To submit your applications please go to www.smos2015.info –> Training Course and use the link on the bottom of the page.

New data, old features to re-consider…

Category : L2, L3, Ocean

posted by Christophe MAES

blog2smos

Signature of the equatorial upwelling conditions in the Pacific Ocean in terms of SSS (as shown larger than 34.8) in conjunction of SST (black thick line represents the 28°C isotherm, ci=1°C) and of density (blue thick line represents the 22.5 kg/m3 isolign, ci=0.5) as derived from the SMOS satellite mission.

A salient feature of the present-day climate is the equatorial gradient of sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, characterized by a warm pool in the west (>28°C) and a cold tongue in the east (<20°C). The upwelling conditions caused by the local divergence of currents in the cold tongue also advects salty water upward along the equatorial thermocline. If the climatological evidence broadly depicts such conditions, the space-borne measurements of the SMOS mission reveal for the first time the detailed structure of the SSS signature at the full scale of the Pacific basin (see also the accompanying figure at different time periods). The SSS in the equatorial cold tongue is typically found to be greater than 35.1 within a narrow 2° band of latitude that is positioned slightly south of the equator and that stretches across the eastern Pacific basin up to the Galapagos Islands. On the northern edge of the eastern equatorial Pacific this signature results in a very strong horizontal gradient (larger than 2 units over 100 km) with the fresh waters of the Panama warm pool. By considering a water density criterion (a computation based on SST and SSS fields, both from the satellite mission), it can be shown that the cold tongue is characterized by a strong seasonal cycle with a 3°C amplitude in SST where the warm season of February-March contrasts with the cold season extending from September to November. As the representation of surface salinity in ocean models improves, the present analyses of SSS should prove to be a useful means for investigating the variability of the cold tongue on ENSO and longer interannual time scales.

Reference: The salinity signature of the equatorial Pacific cold tongue as revealed by the satellite SMOS mission, by Christophe Maes (IRD/LPO), Nicolas Reul (IFREMER/LOS), David Behringer (NOAA/NWS/NCEP) and Terence O’Kane (CSIRO); accepted for publication in Geoscience Letters, 2014.

Contact: Christophe.Maes@ird.fr

Towards a Flood risk alert system with SMOS?

Category : CATDS, L3, L4

SMOS gives almost real time information on soil moisture. At CESBIO / CATDS we had the idea to investigate with Capgemini how such a piece of crucial information could be used to anticipate flood risks. Using the Capgemini « Rodger » platform, we merged SMOS historical records of Soil Moisture, SMOS actual surface soil moisture information and rainfall forecasts to build a flood risk indicator.

Even though our approach is still in infancy and there are still a number of open issues to sort out (not mentioning when the extreme rainfall forecast are inadequate) we score  several successes during the past months and most notably during the recent floods in Morocco which occurred a few days ago.

floods-morocco_20141122

flood risks as obtained on November 22nd, 2014

floods-morocco_20141125

Same for November 25, 2014

So some work is still to be done but we are getting there!

Stay tuned!

Ahmad, Audrey, Julien, Sat and Yann

5 years ago today ….

Category : Non classé

… The first SMOS Image was acquired … and processed giving some (strange) soil moisture estimates but proving that the whole concept worked, including image reconstruction!

First_SM

A lot a progresses have been made since so a big thanks to all of you who contributed to this huge success!

Yann for the whole SMOS gang from all over the globe (including the retired and pensioners)