Research Assistant or Research Associate in Land Surface... Research Assistant or Research Associate in Land Surface Modeling and Soil Moisture Scaling Summary: A postdoctoral position is available to evaluate the performance of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) in reproducing soil moisture dynamics and key land-atmosphere interactions in the UK at hyper-spatial resolution in combination with novel...

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Vacancy Notice at Eumetsat for a Research Fellowship... EUMETSAT opens a VN for a Research Fellowship : Use of satellite soil moisture information for Nowcasting-VN_140721140322_EN[1]Short Range NWP forecasts at CNMCA (Italian National Meteorological Center) NWP section Pratica di Mare (Rome) Italy

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SMOS and La Niña signature.... Analyzing the 2010-2011 La Niña signature in the tropical Pacific sea surface salinity using in situ data, SMOS observations and a numerical simulation Audrey Hasson(1, *), Thierry Delcroix(1), Jacqueline Boutin(2), Raphael Dussin(3), Joaquim Ballabrera-Poy(4) The tropical Pacific Ocean remained in a La Niña phase from mid 2010 to mid-2012. The near-surface...

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A SSS trip from the surface to the thermocline... By Christophe Maes Retrievals of the Sea Surface Salinity from space-borne mission like SMOS or Aquarius SAC-D provide for the first time an essential variable in the determination of ocean mass. If the field will reveal a lot of new signal at the surface its influence on the ocean dynamics is even more important at depths where it participates to the stratification...

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SMOS Level3 Catch Up data available! All SMOS L3 soil moisture products and SMOS L3 brightness temperature products from January 2010 to December 2013 have just been reprocessed and are available as usual on the CATDS FTP server (NB for new users,  please contact support@catds.fr. to gain access) This catch up processing harmonizes the whole data set to the version currently running on the operational...

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Research Assistant or Research Associate in Land Surface Modeling and Soil Moisture Scaling

Category : position opening

Research Assistant or Research Associate in Land Surface Modeling and Soil Moisture Scaling
Summary: A postdoctoral position is available to evaluate the performance of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) in reproducing soil moisture dynamics and key land-atmosphere interactions in the UK at hyper-spatial resolution in combination with novel cosmic-ray soil moisture technology and remote sensing products. A PhD in meteorology/hydrology or related disciplines (e.g. environmental science) with an interest in land-atmosphere interactions, numerical modeling, remote sensing, and data assimilation is essential.

This 30-month appointment (with potential extension to 36 months) is part of the NERC-funded project AMUSED (A MUlti-scale Soil moisture-Evapotranspiration Dynamics study) whose ultimate goal is to identify the spatiotemporal scale-dependency of key dominant processes that control changes in soil moisture and land-atmosphere interactions. AMUSED will employ new innovative technology for soil moisture monitoring using cosmic-rays sensors in combination with land surface modeling, satellite remote sensing, and data assimilation methods. Some fieldwork will take place, especially at the initial stages of the project to deploy and install/calibrate cosmic-ray soil moisture sensors. For more information about AMUSED, please visit http://www.bris.ac.uk/cabot/news/2014/502.html.

Required skills include experience using land surface models (e.g., JULES, CLM, Noah, VIC) to predict soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions, some programming knowledge (e.g., Fortran or C) and experience with Linux operating system, demonstrated ability to publish peer-reviewed papers, effective written and oral communication skills, willingness to work in a team, in an academic research environment, and development collaborative links.

Desired skills include knowledge of hydrometeorology, land-atmosphere interactions, data assimilation and/or remote sensing, and some previous experience with fieldwork activities.

For informal inquiries, please contact Dr Rafael Rosolem (rafael.rosolem@bristol.ac.uk)

To apply, please visit http://bit.ly/1wor2CP
or
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AJP006/research-assistant-or-research-associate-in-land-surface-modelling-and-soil-moisture-scaling/

Vacancy Notice at Eumetsat for a Research Fellowship

Category : position opening

EUMETSAT opens a VN for a

Research Fellowship :

Use of satellite soil moisture information for Nowcasting-VN_140721140322_EN[1]Short Range NWP forecasts

at CNMCA (Italian National Meteorological Center) NWP section
Pratica di Mare (Rome) Italy

vacancy-1

vacancy-2

SMOS and « La Niña » signature….

Category : CATDS, L2, Model, Ocean, Satellite

Analyzing the 2010-2011 La Niña signature in the tropical Pacific sea surface salinity using in situ data, SMOS observations and a numerical simulation

Audrey Hasson(1, *), Thierry Delcroix(1), Jacqueline Boutin(2),

Raphael Dussin(3), Joaquim Ballabrera-Poy(4)

The tropical Pacific Ocean remained in a La Niña phase from mid 2010 to mid-2012. The near-surface salinity signature of this cold El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase is shown in the figure below and analysed in Hasson et. al (2014) using a combination of numerical model output, in situ data and SMOS satellite salinity products.

boutin-la nina

Figure: Sea Surface Salinity anomalies relative to each product 2010-2011 monthly climatology (pss) in July 2010 (left panels) and July 2011 (right panels) for (a, d) ISAS in situ product (b, e) SMOS and (c, f) the model. Blue lines represent the Voluntary Observing Ship routes and the 170°E-180° hatched areas computation zones. (Figure from Hasson et al., 2014)

Comparisons of all salinity products show a good agreement between them, with a RMS error of 0.2-0.3 between the thermosalinograph (TSG) and SMOS data and between the TSG and model data. The last 6 months of 2010 (La Niña) are characterized by an unusually strong tri-polar anomaly captured by the three salinity products in the western half of the tropical Pacific. A positive SSS anomaly sits north of 10ºS (>0.5), a negative tilted anomaly lies between 10ºS and 20ºS and a positive one south of 20ºS. In 2011, anomalies shift south and amplify up to 0.8, except for the one south of 20ºS. Equatorial SSS changes are mainly the result of anomalous zonal advection, resulting in negative anomalies during El Niño (early 2010), and positive ones thereafter during La Niña. The mean seasonal and interannual poleward drift then exports those anomalies toward the south in the southern hemisphere, resulting in the aforementioned tripolar anomaly. The vertical salinity flux at the bottom of the mixed layer tends to resist the surface salinity changes. The observed basin-scale La Niña SSS signal is then compared in Hasson et al. (2014) with the historical 1998-1999 La Niña event using both observations and modelling.

for more details see Hasson, A., T. Delcroix, J. Boutin, R. Dussin, and J. Ballabrera-Poy (2014), Analyzing the 2010–2011 La Niña signature in the tropical Pacific sea surface salinity using in situ data, SMOS observations, and a numerical simulation, Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 119(6), 3855-3867, doi:10.1002/2013JC009388.

(1) LEGOS, UMR 5566, CNES, CNRS, IRD, Université de Toulouse 14 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France

(2) LOCEAN, UMR7159, CNRS, UPMC, IRD, MNHN, Paris, France

(3) LEGI, Grenoble, France

(4) ICM/CSIC, Barcelona, Spain

(*) Corresponding author,Audrey.Hasson@legos.obs-mip.fr. Currently at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory,California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA

A SSS trip from the surface to the thermocline…

Category : L2, Non classé, Ocean

By Christophe Maes

Retrievals of the Sea Surface Salinity from space-borne mission like SMOS or Aquarius SAC-D provide for the first time an essential variable in the determination of ocean mass. If the field will reveal a lot of new signal at the surface its influence on the ocean dynamics is even more important at depths where it participates to the stratification of the water column. Concomitant with temperature profiles, reliable in situ observations of salinity at depth are now available at the global ocean scales. Above the main pycnocline (50-250m in the Tropics), Maes and O’Kane (2014) have recently shown that the stabilizing effect due to salinity could be isolated from its thermal counterpart by separating its role in the computation of the buoyancy frequency. In addition, relationships between such salinity stratification at depths and the SSS are shown to be well defined and quasi-linear in the tropics (see figure), providing some indication that in the future, analyses that consider both satellite surface salinity measurements at the surface and vertical profiles at depth will result in a better determination of the role of the salinity stratification in climate prediction systems.

maes

Maes, C., and T. J. O’Kane (2014), Seasonal variations of the upper ocean salinity stratification in the Tropics, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 119, 1706–1722, doi:10.1002/2013JC009366.