L band continuation... a need! Dear colleagues, The 3rd Satellite Soil Moisture Validation and Application Workshop took place in September 2016 in New York City. The workshop summary has just been published in the GEWEX newsletter (p 29-31). You may want to look at it and note that at the end (page 31) it states that "The workshop participants recommended that instruments taking passive microwave...

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PhD Position at isardSAT isardSAT are looking for a candidate for a "Industrial Doctorate" on the estimation of root zone soil moisture from remote sensing data. The applicant will work at isardSAT, a remote sensing company based in Barcelona, Spain. The academic institution responsible for the doctorate is the Ebro Observatory (Ramon Llull University), located in Tortosa (Tarragona province)....

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Along the lines of my last post on this blog... a position... Last June, the EU hosted workshops dedicated to: Gathering user requirements for the next generation of the Copernicus Space Component. Among them one dedicated to Polar and snow cover applications. Polar and Snow Cover Applications – User Requirements Workshop. 23 June 2016, Brussels. Full text, presentations and report are available here. As far as...

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What's next? Dear reader of this blog. As you are well aware SMOS and SMAP (and Aquarius for that matter) are delivering excellent data, demonstrating every day the usefulness and uniqueness of L Band data for monitoring certain facets of our planet. Moreover, many operational or pre-operational applications are emerging. The sad thing is that our dear satellites are like us, they...

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Seven Years ago... SMOS was delivering it's first image... Now after seven years, not only SMOS data quality has greatly improved but also  has been used in an ever increasing number of scientific and applied uses. This is due to both the quality and uniqueness of the measurements and because the measurements are new and very relevant. To illustrate this point let's have a look at...

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L band continuation… a need!

Category : Data

Dear colleagues,
The 3rd Satellite Soil Moisture Validation and Application Workshop took place in September 2016 in New York City.

The workshop summary has just been published in the GEWEX newsletter (p 29-31). You may want to look at it and note that at the end (page 31) it states that « The workshop participants recommended that instruments taking passive microwave L-Band measurements be continued in new constellations of satellites (i.e., complementing the ASCAT and AMSR series, and the Sentinel-1s). »


PhD Position at isardSAT

Category : position opening

isardSAT are looking for a candidate for a « Industrial Doctorate » on the estimation of root zone soil moisture from remote sensing data.

The applicant will work at isardSAT, a remote sensing company based in Barcelona, Spain. The academic institution responsible for the doctorate is the Ebro Observatory (Ramon Llull University), located in Tortosa (Tarragona province). The PhD will be involved in the H2020-RISE REC project (rec.isardSAT.com).

The doctorate depends on funding by the Spanish government, which depends on the quality of both, the candidate and the project.

Further details of the project and the profile of the desired candidate in the isardSAT_Doctorat_Industrial_2017

Along the lines of my last post on this blog… a position paper and workshop report!

Category : Non classé

Last June, the EU hosted workshops dedicated to:

Gathering user requirements for the next generation of the Copernicus Space Component.

Among them one dedicated to Polar and snow cover applications.

Polar and Snow Cover Applications

User Requirements Workshop.

23 June 2016, Brussels.

Full text, presentations and report are available here.

As far as L band radiometry is concerned it is an interesting  report. It was probably built upon the  Position paper prepared by representatives of CMEMS. The operational Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Service (CMEMS) provides regular and systematic core reference information on the state of the global ocean and regional seas. Excerpts from the above mentioned position report (available) are given  here:

« The current CMEMS Arctic coupled ice-ocean model system is able to assimilate sea ice concentration data to constrain the position of the ice edge as well as sea ice thickness data for both thin ice (SMOS) and thick ice (ICESat/Cryosat-2), although ice thickness is not assimilated yet in the products available today. Ice drift data is currently assimilated but not as successfully as the other two variables.« 

« …. However, for operational sea ice monitoring, input to sea ice models and sea ice charting, satellite measurements of the thin sea ice below 0.5 m (SMOS- like) is indeed also required »

and in their conclusions, one recommendation is : Continuation of SMOS like observations of thin sea ice below 0.5 m.

The workshop reports also provides the same requirements for L Band radiometry, but also states the question of potential pH estimates using a SMOS -like instrument.

==> « Can SMOS data deliveri nformation about pH of sea surface (and therefore about acidification of sea water)? Could this become an operational product? »

I believe that recent results on snow density with SMOS (FMI and Gamma-RS/WSL) as well as freeze / thaw mapping (FMI) using SMOS could have been mentioned.

So to make a long story short SMOS as a positive impact on Polar and snow science with several applications (SMOS being also available in NRT) and is requested by the user’s community alongside with other missions… and there are many other domains where L Band radiometry is also a key element….

Stay tuned and do not hesitate to provide your inputs!


What’s next?

Category : Data, Satellite

Dear reader of this blog.

As you are well aware SMOS and SMAP (and Aquarius for that matter) are delivering excellent data, demonstrating every day the usefulness and uniqueness of L Band data for monitoring certain facets of our planet. Moreover, many operational or pre-operational applications are emerging. The sad thing is that our dear satellites are like us, they don’t get younger with time. … and no follow on L Band radiometers are currently decided. We are thus facing a severe data gap if a follow-on is not very soon set up.

Actually the situation is getting somewhat critical and i am convinced we should get moving quite soon on this critical issue.

I thought that we could use this forum to highlight the areas the expression of needs for L band radiometry. If you have interesting elements let me know!

In the mean time see 6 years of global soil moisture as prepared by Ali Mahmoodi with 6 years of  SMOS data.anim-sm-6y

Monthly evolution of soil moisture for teh first 6 years of SMOS (2010-2015)

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