SMOS REPROCESSED Level 2 DATA (V6) now available

Category : Data, L1, L2, Ocean

Dear SMOS data user -

We would like to inform you that the reprocessed level 2 soil moisture and sea surface salinity data are now available on the new ESA SMOS Online Dissemination service: https://smos-ds-02.eo.esa.int/oads/access/.

This release aligns the Level 2 soil moisture and sea surface salinity data available operationally already since May 2015 with the reprocessed data archive: SMOS data users now have a complete v6 data set available.

The algorithm evolutions implemented in the v6 data set are described in the respective Algorithm Theoretical Baseline Documents (ATBDs) and in the read-me-first notes: https://earth.esa.int/web/guest/missions/esa-operational-eo-missions/smos/content/-/asset_publisher/t5Py/content/data-types-levels-formats-7631. We would like to encourage all users to familiarise themselves with the read-me-first notes before using the data.

The level 2 reprocessed data products are available on the new ESA SMOS Online Dissemination service accessible here (smos-diss.eo.esa.int). The new service allows to access data by https and ftp/ftps transfer protocols for all registered ESA EO Single Sign-On (EO-SSO) users. The online service facilitates the data access with enhanced functionality for data navigation and selection by data type, acquisition time, geographical area and data format (i.e. ESA Earth Explorer (EEF) or NetCDF format).

SMOS level 1 brightness temperature data and  ECMWF auxiliary products are also available from the new ESA SMOS Online Dissemination service.

For further details on how to access the SMOS data  and how to register as ESA EO_SSO please https://earth.esa.int/web/guest/missions/esa-operational-eo-missions/smos/content/-/asset_publisher/t5Py/content/how-to-obtain-data-7329.

Kind regards

Susanne Mecklenburg

NEW REPROCESSED SMOS DATA IS available at CATDS!

Category : CATDS, L3, Ocean

Dear  SMOS users,

All the SMOS L3 soil moisture, ocean salinity and common products, from January 2010 to April 2015, have been reprocessed. You can download those products from

a) CATDS with the usual procedure (if you do not have a password contact contact support@catds.fr to get one) or

b) through the SIPAD interface (http://www.catds.fr/sipad/).

Please NOTE :
- All the reprocessed products use the EASE2 grid.
- The CATDS processor’s version used is 300, which correspond to the DPGS version v620
- The reprocessed products are tagged RE04
- These reprocessed products are derived using the same algorithm as the one used in the CATDS real time processing, hence ensuring temporal continuity.
- A new RFI (radio frequency interference) probability product is available.

Very soon we will also make available 6 years of root zone soil moisture from SMOS

We appreciate your feed back so do not hesitate to contact us

Remember the SMOSDATA POLICY : The CATDS data are freely distributed. However, when using these data in a publication, we request that the following acknowledgement be given :
« These data were obtained from the « Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS » (CATDS), operated for the « Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales » (CNES, France) by IFREMER (Brest, France) »

Vacancy : Researcher in Ocean Remote Sensing and Water Cycle

Category : Ocean, position opening

job position-ifremer1

Ifremer, through its research work and expert advice, contributes to knowledge of the oceans and their resources, to monitoring of marine and coastal environments and to the sustainable development of marine activities. To these ends, Ifremer conceives and operates tools for observation, experimentation and monitoring, and manage the oceanographic databases.
Created in 1984, Ifremer is a public institute of an industrial and commercial nature (EPIC). It is supervised jointly by the Ministry of Higher Education and Research and the Ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy. Within Ifremer, the Laboratory of Oceanography from Space (LOS) is seeking to appoint a Researcher to reinforce is major role and expertise for the production, validation and scientific exploitation of the Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) data obtained from several satellite missions such as SMOS, Aquarius, potentially SMAP and AMSR-2. LOS develops closed partnerships with the French scientific community, also collaborating with international partner organisations (ESA, CNES, NASA, EUMETSAT,..) in the frame of several national and international projects, including contractual activities.
The LOS includes a research and data processing team to gain a better knowledge of the ocean from various observations. This group gathers technicians, engineers and researchers to conduct analyses, algorithm development, processing and distribution of elaborated geophysical products derived from the combination of in situ and satellite observations, such as surface winds, surface waves, currents, surface temperature and salinity, sea ice characteristics, …
The satellite missions to estimate sea surface Salinity are rather new with the first launch end 2009 for the ESA SMOS mission. These new datasets still demand a strong expertise in both passive microwave remote sensing and ocean surface physics. A thematic exploitation platform dedicated to ocean surface salinity is currently under development to aim at fostering the scientific use of both satellite and in situ SSS observations, complemented and used synergistically with observations from numerous other Earth observation instruments (temperature, altimetry, scatterometry, optical and ocean color properties, precipitation,..).
The successful researcher will contribute to improve our understanding of the dynamical processes responsible for the variability of the SSS fields associated with the global water cycle. Research themes are open to different aspects on specific physical processes (vertical mixing at small scale, meso-scale horizontal transport, air-sea interactions, Evaporation minus Precipitation or river run off fluxes, mixed layer and haline stratification, etc..) or/and focus on key geographic zones (oceanic basins, marginal seas, river run off, Tropical Cyclone area, polar regions..). The researcher will develop analyses based on existing in situ and satellite data but will also consider the potential combination with new and future missions observations (Sentinel-1 and 3, SMAP launched since january 2015, CFOSAT with a foresseen launch in December 2017, or SWOT in 2020).
As principal activities, the researcher will have to:
• Undertake studies on the signatures of the global water cycle and its variability in ocean surface salinity,
• Exploit the complementarities between in situ and satellite observations characterizing the upper ocean salinity,
• Participate to the definition and exploitation of future and new observations (combined exploitation, SMOS follow on, GNSS-R, …), and of new measurement protocols,• Identify new fields of applications involving the combined use of observations characterizing the coupled atmosphere/ocean/land/ice system.

More details here

job position-ifremer

SMOS, AMSR-2 and SMAp join forces to track Hurricanes!

Category : L3, L4, Ocean

N Reul and colleagues looked at the signatures of 3 co-evolving 2015 major Hurricanes from 22 Aug to 9 September 2015 in the East and Central tropical Pacific  using SMOS, SMAP and AMSR-2 observations (beyond others)

from Nicolas REUL (IFREMER) from teh SMOS + Storm evolution project (ESA)

Modis-and-SMOS

Legend: true-colour composite from the MODIS instrument on NASA’s Terra satellite and SMOS surface wind speed amplitude of hurricanes Kilo (left), Ignacio (centre) and Jimena (right) on 29 August 2015. All three were category-4 hurricanes and spanned the central and eastern Pacific basins. The bright bands in the images are sunglint where solar radiation from the Sun has reflected from Earth back to the satellite sensor.

This year sees a strong El Niño event which causes much higher temperatures than normal in the upper layers of the Tropical East Pacific. The available surplus heat favors an increased occurrence of Tropical Cyclones and storms. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), this season has been ranked as the fifth most active hurricane season within the Eastern Pacific since 1971.  In a normal season, the average number of Major Hurricanes (Category 3 and plus in the Saffir-Simpson scale) is expected to be 3 whereas this year already 8 Major Hurricanes have occurred.  At the end of August, three Category 4 hurricanes (named Kilo, Ignacio and Jimena) developed in parallel in the vicinity of Hawaii which MODIS and SMOS sensors were well able to capture.

Several types of satellites observations are available to characterize surface winds over the ocean such as active scatterometer radars and passive low-frequency radiometers operating in C and L-band. The advantage of using such radiometers, being an all-weather tool, lies in detecting extreme wind speed (above 33 m/s, i.e., hurricane force) which scatterometers are not able to detect. Three such radiometers, namely, the ESA/SMOS and the recently launched NASA/SMAP L-band and the JAXA/AMSR-2 C-band, are now available to provide such observations.

SMOS surface Tbs and wind speed products along SMOS swaths were determined using the algorithm of  Reul et al., 2012 and updated in Reul et al., 2015. Image Reconstruction based on JRECON (J. Tenerelli, 2011). SMOS Level 1b Tbs are retrieved at antenna level and are further corrected for extra-terrestrial sources contributions, smooth sea surface emission, and atmospheric path effetcs to estimate a storm-surface induced Tb residual. A Quadratic Wind speed GMF is applied to the First Stokes parameter residual  to obtain U, the surface wind speed. Current validation reveals an rms of ~5 m/s up to 50 m/s with respect SFMR flight data or H*Wind analysis at the same spatial resolution than SMOS.

AMSR-2 surface winds are obtained using the  Algorithm developed by Zabolotskikh et al. (2013, 2015a,b) which involves the combined used of highest frequency Chanels (for rain retrieval) and atmosphere corrected 6.925 and 7.3 GHz channels for surface wind inversion.

SMAP: Level 1B data from NSIDC are used, surface first-stokes residual contributions are evaluated  (corrections for atmospheric, cosmic background reflections and smooth ocean surface emission), data with significant galactic reflections are not used  (asc fore beam data are not considered). GMF of Reul et al. 2015 developed for SMOS is applied to retrieved SWS. A systematic offset of -5m/s was added to the retrievals for consistency with ECMWF & NCEP winds for winds <20 m/s)

Thanks to the density of observations available from these 3 missions, the evolution of surface wind speed under tropical storms can now be monitored with an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. The example of the 3 co-evolving hurricanes in the East Pacific demonstrate this capability with an ensemble of 121 satellite swath intercepts of the 3 storms obtained by combining the data from the 3 sensors over a period of about 15 days (22 Aug to 7 Sep). The below animation shows the time-series mosaic of surface wind speed measurements under Hurricanes Kilo, Ignacio and Jimena. Data from the three satellite microwave radiometer missions: ESA’s L-band SMOS, NASA’s L-band SMAP and Japan’s C-band AMSR-2 are combined to reveal the track of each hurricane and maximum wind speed measured by each sensor at the ocean surface during the period.

see –> winds from SMOS, AMSR-2 and SMAP

wind-speed-contours-3Brothers

Caption: Contours of the domains showing the maxima of surface winds obtained from the combined multiple observations of SMOS, SMAP and AMSR-2 sensors from 22 Aug to 9 Sep 2015 showing the high wind trails over Hurricanes Kilo and Loke (left), Ignacio (center), Jimena (right).

Comparison of the Maxima of winds from the 3 satellites with Best-Track Maximum winds is shown here below.

Max-Wind-kilo-Ignacio-Jimena

Caption: Time series of the Maximum Sustained wind speed as provided by TC’s center (NOAA/HRD and NHC) together with the Maximum wind estimated from SMOS, SMAP and AMSR-2 fro Jimena (top), Ignacio (middle) and Kilo (bottom).

Limitations in the highest wind domains is not due to Tb saturation but to the 30-40 km spatial resolution smoothing effect (Highest-wind generally occur in a narrow region of radius < ~100km around the eyes with very high Wind speed radial gradients).

Key characteristics of hurricanes, such as the radii of wind speeds above a certain threshold (i.e. 34, 50, 64 and 84 knots), can now be captured more often in far more detail. This will greatly improve the representation of initial conditions of Tropical Cyclones in Numerical Weather forecasting systems and hence their prediction.

Interestingly, the higher resolution in space and time of the surface forcing that is gained by the merging of the data from these 3 low MW frequency sensors  will certainly help inferring better understanding of the ocean-atmosphere interactions in TCs:

sst_wake_3brothers

Caption: Sea Surface Temperature anomalies (in degrees Celcius) reveal cold-water wakes trailing behind hurricanes Kilo, Ignacio, and Jimena highlighting the power of hurricane winds to violently stir the upper ocean and bring cooler waters at depth to the ocean surface.

See as well a recent ESA web-story on the same topic

References

Reul, N., J. Tenerelli, B. Chapron, D. Vandemark, Y. Quilfen, and Y. Kerr (2012), SMOS satellite L-band radiometer: A new capability for ocean surface remote sensing in hurricanes, J. Geophys. Res., 117, C02006, doi:10.1029/2011JC007474.

Reul, N. et al, A revised L-band radio-brightness sensitivity to extreme winds under Tropical Cyclones: the 5
years SMOS-storm database, submitted to Remote Sensing of Environment, 2015.

E. V. Zabolotskikh, L. M. Mitnik, and B. Chapron, “New approach for severe marine weather study using satellite passive microwave sensing,” Geophys. Res. Lett., vol. 40, no. 13, pp. 3347–3350, 2013.

E. Zabolotskikh, L. Mitnik, N. Reul, and B. Chapron, “New Possibilities for Geophysical Parameter Retrievals Opened by GCOM-W1 AMSR2,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Appl. Earth Obs. Remote Sens., vol. PP, no. 99, pp. 1–14, 2015a.

E. Zabolotskikh, N. Reul and B. Chapron,  “Geophysical model function for the AMSR2 C- band wind excess emissivity at at high winds“, submitted to GRSL, 2015b.

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