Antarctica’s internal ice sheet temperature from SMOS

Category : CATDS, Data, L4

The new version of the internal ice sheet temperature estimated from SMOS over Antarctica is now available.This dataset is based on the combination of L-band (1.4 GHz) passive microwave observations with glaciological and emission models. The study highlights the potential of low microwave frequencies for investigating the internal temperature of the ice sheet.

fig_icesheet_tempmap

Figure : Ice temperature (K) derived from SMOS at depths of 1000 m (left) and 1500 m (right).

For more information see –>  G. Macelloni, M. Leduc-Leballeur, F. Montomoli, M. Brogioni, C. Ritz, G. Picard, 2019, On the retrieval of internal temperature of Antarctica Ice Sheet by using SMOS observations, Remote Sensing of Environment, 233, doi:10.1016/j.rse.2019.111405

Datasets are available at CATDS

SMOS Mission Extended to 2021!

Category : CATDS, Data, L1, L2, L3, L4, Non classé, Satellite

I am glad to inform you that yesterday the Program Board for Earth Observation (PB-EO) of ESA voted the SMOS mission extension following the ACEO (Advisory Committee for Earth Observation) review report:

« Member states’ delegations were very positive about both the achievements so far as well as the detailed plan being put forward for the extension. « 

CNES (the French Space Agency also funding the mission exploitation), has already granted funding until 2021 (actually 2019 with extension to 2021 pending PB-EO vote which we now have).

So, should everything go nicely with the satellite and platform, we have data guaranteed until  2021!

Congratulations and many thanks to all the actors of this success.

SMOS is now over 9 year old and still going strong by the way!

Yann

Special Issue « New Outstanding Results over Land from the SMOS Mission »

Category : Data

from Amen Al-Yaari and Arnaud Mialon

Call for publications

Dear Colleagues,

Surface soil moisture (the water content in the first centimeters of soil) is an essential climate variable that plays an important role in land–atmosphere interactions. Soil moisture is widely used in improving climate model predictions/projections, weather forecasting, drought monitoring, rainfall estimations, etc.

Monitoring surface soil moisture at a global scale has recently become possible thanks to microwave remote sensing. SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) was the first dedicated soil moisture mission that has been in orbit for eight years. The SMOS satellite was launched by the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2009, carrying on board a radiometer in the L-band frequency with a native spatial resolution of ~43 km. Since then, soil moisture and vegetation optical depth (VOD) have been retrieved from multi-angular brightness temperature observations relying mainly on a radiative transfer model.

This is a dedicated Special Issue on SMOS. We welcome studies on all subjects that are related to the SMOS satellite and its products.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • the improvements in the soil moisture/VOD retrieval algorithms;
  • the evaluation/validation of the SMOS soil moisture and VOD products;
  • SMOS synergy with other remote sensing observations or models simulations;
  • SMOS soil moisture/VOD applications for agriculture, hydrology, etc.

Dr. Amen Al-Yaari
Dr. Arnaud Mialon
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

http://www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing/special_issues/smos_rs

Post-doctoral position Water extent mapping from data fusion of L-Band radiometry and radar

Category : CATDS, Data, L3, L4, position opening

logo_cesbio


Post-doctoral position

Water extent mapping from data fusion of L-Band radiometry and radar

Location: Centre d’Etudes Spatiale de la Biosphère (CESBIO), Toulouse, France

Duration: 18 months start before November 2018

Description:

Interested in creating state of the art remote sensing products in hydrology for existing and future satellite mission, then join us ! In the framework of the future Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT), a joint mission from French (CNES), American (NASA), Canadian (CSA), and British (UKSA) space agencies, CNES is developing a down-stream application service that will also integrate products from contemporary satellites. In 2008 the CNES had already developed a downstream centre (CATDS www.catds.fr) for the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission which is providing today high level products for the mission. You will join the Microwave-SMOS group in the Observation Systems team at CESBIO. You will be under the supervision of Ahmad Al bitar (Ph.D.) who si in charge of high end (L4) products for CATDS and member of the Science Team of SWOT. You will contribute to existing collaborations with other institutions: LEGOS, GET, ECOLAB, Univ. Purpan.  You will be in charge of developing operationally ready products for the monitoring of inland water surfaces (wetlands, floodplains…) by extending the domain of application of existing algorithms and improving their resolution. These areas represent a great challenge and raise important scientific questions related to the water cycle, biodiversity and carbon cycle. Recent studies at CESBIO demonstrated the advantage of the use of L-Band for the monitoring of water surfaces under dense tropical forests. The final objective is to enrich the existing databases at global scale (CCI Water bodies, GSWO, GIEMS) and to make available a validation dataset for the future SWOT mission.

Actions:

> Adapting the retrieval algorithms for global application using L-Band brightness temperatures.
> Writing scientific papers, presenting results at conferences and project key-points.

Required Skills:

> Advanced knowledge of one programming language Matlab, Python using geospatial datasets.
> Proven writing and communication skills.
> Motivated, innovative and team-player.

Links:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/317012733_Mapping_Dynamic_Water_Fraction_under_the_Tropical_Rain_Forests_of_the_Amazonian_Basin_from_SMOS_Brightness_Temperatures

Contact:

e-mail to : ahmad.albitar@cesbio.cnes.fr & santiago.penaluque@cnes.fr

download wordpress themes