8+ years of soil moisture and ocean salinity data over the globe from SMOS

Category : CATDS, L2, L3, Ocean

This animation was prepared by Dimitry Khvorostyanov from LOCEAN with SMOS data from CATDS (Soil moisture level 3 and Ocean salinity debiased V3)

Enjoy

Special Issue « New Outstanding Results over Land from the SMOS Mission »

Category : Data

from Amen Al-Yaari and Arnaud Mialon

Call for publications

Dear Colleagues,

Surface soil moisture (the water content in the first centimeters of soil) is an essential climate variable that plays an important role in land–atmosphere interactions. Soil moisture is widely used in improving climate model predictions/projections, weather forecasting, drought monitoring, rainfall estimations, etc.

Monitoring surface soil moisture at a global scale has recently become possible thanks to microwave remote sensing. SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) was the first dedicated soil moisture mission that has been in orbit for eight years. The SMOS satellite was launched by the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2009, carrying on board a radiometer in the L-band frequency with a native spatial resolution of ~43 km. Since then, soil moisture and vegetation optical depth (VOD) have been retrieved from multi-angular brightness temperature observations relying mainly on a radiative transfer model.

This is a dedicated Special Issue on SMOS. We welcome studies on all subjects that are related to the SMOS satellite and its products.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • the improvements in the soil moisture/VOD retrieval algorithms;
  • the evaluation/validation of the SMOS soil moisture and VOD products;
  • SMOS synergy with other remote sensing observations or models simulations;
  • SMOS soil moisture/VOD applications for agriculture, hydrology, etc.

Dr. Amen Al-Yaari
Dr. Arnaud Mialon
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

http://www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing/special_issues/smos_rs

Research Engineer in Remote Sensing: Characterising Uncertainties in Satellite Sea Surface Salinity

Category : Ocean, position opening

A research engineer position is open at the Laboratoire d’Océanographie et du Climat – Expérimentation et Approches Numériques (LOCEAN)/ Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), PARIS, starting as soon as possible. The position is open for one year, renewable for 2 years depending on the candidate performance.

Context:

The SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission is the first Earth-observing satellite mission carrying an L-band radiometer interferometer. Since its launch at the end of 2009, it has acquired more than 8 years of data that demonstrate the feasibility of the sea surface salinity retrieved by satellite with remarkable spatial resolution compared to other techniques. It has also opened new research perspectives. This unique 8-year salinity time series has permitted unique analyses of salinity variability, linked to oceanic meso-scale and to El Niño type events. Two other satellite missions, Aquarius (2011-2015, CONAE/NASA) and SMAP (2015-, NASA), also based on L-band radiometry, have been providing complementary synoptic salinity measurements leading to an unprecedented spatial coverage. Nevertheless, uncertainties on retrieved salinities differ depending on the radiometer type, the observation geometry, the calibration method, and on the direct and inverse models.

The LOCEAN team is involved since 1999 in the definition of the direct and inverse models applicable to SMOS and in the calibration-validation of the SMOS measurements. It is recognized as SMOS expert support laboratory by the European Spatial Agency (ESA) and by the Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS funded by Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The selected candidate will join the LOCEAN team involved in the physics of the L-band radiometry, in the satellite salinity validation and in the understanding of responsible processes for the observed differences between satellites and in situ measurements, in particular those associated with air-sea interactions, vertical stratification and small-scale variability (www.locean-ipsl.upmc.fr/smos/ and siss.locean-ipsl.upmc.fr).

Work details :

- Characterization of uncertainties of satellite salinity products based on intercomparisons of the various satellite products and comparisons with in situ measurements. This work will be based on existing tools that the selected engineer will adapt to focus on case studies allowing the identification of the uncertainties origin. It will be performed in strong collaboration with researchers and engineers of the LOCEAN SMOS team.

- SMOS data processor development assessment in collaboration with the engineers and researchers in charge of its evolution. Participation to regular progress meetings (teleconferences) of CATDS (2-3 per year).

- Support to users (in French and English)

-Writing of technical papers and participation to scientific papers is possible, depending on the obtained results.

Required Skills:

-       Physics of satellite measurement

-       Data statistical analysis and critical interpretation of the results

-       Autonomy and team collaborative working

-       Python / Matlab ; LINUX

-       Interest in team software development: object-oriented programming, code refactoring & automated testing (e.g. pytest), version control (e.g. Git), code documentation.

Appreciated Skills:

-       Optimization for large dataset processing

-       Interest for environmental science

-       French and English

Level: Research Engineer (PhD thesis or equivalent). Master 2 in remote sensing will also be considered.

Address : LOCEAN, Sorbonne Université, Tour 45-55, 5E, 4, place Jussieu, 75005 PARIS, FRANCE.

Salary : about 1900E monthly net, commensurable with qualification and experience of the candidate (CNRS salary grid)

Candidates should send a statement of interest, CV and coordinates of 2 referees to  Jacqueline Boutin (jb@locean-ipsl.upmc.fr) and Dimitry Khvorostyanov (dimitry.khvorostyanov@locean.upmc.fr ).

(Very) soon 8 candles for SMOS!!!!!!! (7/8)

Category : Data, L2, L3, L4

After a look back at oceans, soil moisture and their applications let’s have a look at colder areas….

Actually during the SMOS early years we tried to get a cryosphere group  but with very limited success to say the least. Most of them were heavily involved with other missions with little time to spend on an L band radiometer of unfathomed relevance to their science.

But some had ideas and looked at the data very quickly… and the number of research topics rapidly grew! I will try below to give a few examples.

Of course there were some basic uses. Considering the L Band penetration depth in dry ice it was expected to ave a very stable signal in Antarctica suitable for vicarious calibration. While G. Macelloni and colleagues at IFAC implemented a radiometer at Dome Concordia, F Cabot used the site to verify SMOS calibration and sensitivity and after used it to inter-compare with Aquarius and SMAP (using SMOS capability to reconstruct their main lobe characteristics through reconstruction). He routinely monitors the L band radiometers in orbit and with M. Brogioni follows the absolute calibration through the ground radiometer.

domeClegend

Caption: Temporal evolution of all sensors over Dome C (F. Cabot)

Over Antarctica several studies were performed (also funded by ESA) and products were made (available at CATDS) on estimation of internal ice-sheet temperature, estimation of ice thickness, indicator of the origin of ice-shelves variability, surface melting occurrences. But for me the most mind boggling result was obtained right at the beginning by Giovanni who identify definite signatures over lake Vostok which is some 3.7 km below the surface, while models indicate at best a 900 m penetration depth (G. Picard and M. Leduc Leballeur). Several potential explanations have been suggested but are yet to be validated.

Freeze thaw was expected to be a potential products and colleagues at FMI used the Elbara measurements in Sodankylä to devise a Freeze thaw algorithm. It is now quasi operational.

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Caption: Example for final soil freezing date on 2014 calculated from SMOS freeze/thaw data (K Rautiainen)

More novel the idea put forward by several scientists (G. Heygster, L. Kaleschke) to estimate thin sea ice thickness with SMOS. Now an operational product is being produced in Hamburg. It relies on the complementarity between Smos (sensitive below 75 cm thickness) and CryoSat only sensitive above a meter) the synergisms enable to track sea ice thickness globally whatever the thickness in a way, but also thin sea ice monitoring is a boon for ship routing around the Arctic (optimising between distance and ice to be broken through) and is of course very relevant for sea atmosphere exchanges.

anim

Caption: Temporal evolution of sea ice cover over the Arctic (L. Kaleschke)

Another ice cap of great interested is that of Greenland. The L band signatures are somewhat intriguing and several scientists are investigating it. But can already mention capturing significant melt event (as depicted by Mialon and Bircher on this blog) and some preliminary explanations for the different features seen.

Over land the first issue to tackle was that of the thick layers of organic soils whose dielectric constant are quite different from that of mineral soils (even the probes, if not calibrated properly, give wrong estimates). S Bircher and colleagues tackled the issue and developed both an improved dielectric model but also an adapted soils map to make good use of it. This constitutes a major step forward for the analysis of high latitudes. It will also lead to more adequate permafrost monitoring projects.

Finally I believe we are on the verge of another dramatic improvement with the very recent work done at WSL /Gamma by M. Schwank and colleagues and at FMI (K. Rautiainen and J. Lemmetyinen) as they found a way to infer snow density from SMOS data and then they are on the verge of extracting snow water content from L band radiometry.

For the cryosphere, these achievements and notably thins sea ice an snow density / water content are I believe very significant steps forward!

Stay tuned!

For further reading:

Bircher, S., Andreasen, M., Vuollet, J., Vehvilainen, J., Rautiainen, K., Jonard, F., Weihermuller, L., Zakharova, E., Wigneron, J.P., & Kerr, Y.H. (2016). Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers. Geoscientific Instrumentation Methods and Data Systems, 5, 109-125

Bircher, S., & Remote Sensing Editorial, O. (2017). L-Band Relative Permittivity of Organic Soil Surface Layers-A New Dataset of Resonant Cavity Measurements and Model Evaluation (vol 8, 1024, 2016). Remote Sensing, 9

Bircher, S., Demontoux, F., Razafindratsima, S., Zakharova, E., Drusch, M., Wigneron, J.P., & Kerr, Y.H. (2016). L-Band Relative Permittivity of Organic Soil Surface LayersA New Dataset of Resonant Cavity Measurements and Model Evaluation. Remote Sensing, 8

Kaleschke, L., Tian-Kunze, X., Maass, N., Beitsch, A., Wernecke, A., Miernecki, M., Muller, G., Fock, B.H., Gierisch, A.M.U., Schlunzen, K.H., Pohlmann, T., Dobrynin, M., Hendricks, S., Asseng, J., Gerdes, R., Jochmann, P., Reimer, N., Holfort, J., Melsheimer, C., Heygster, G., Spreen, G., Gerland, S., King, J., Skou, N., Sobjaerg, S.S., Haas, C., Richter, F., & Casal, T. (2016). SMOS sea ice product: Operational application and validation in the Barents Sea marginal ice zone. Remote Sensing of Environment, 180, 264-273

Lemmetyinen, J., Schwank, M., Rautiainen, K., Kontu, A., Parkkinen, T., Matzler, C., Wiesmann, A., Wegmuller, U., Derksen, C., Toose, P., Roy, A., & Pulliainen, J. (2016). Snow density and ground permittivity retrieved from L-band radiometry: Application to experimental data. Remote Sensing of Environment, 180, 377-391

Naderpour, R., Schwank, M., Matzler, C., Lemmetyinen, J., & Steffen, K. (2017). Snow Density and Ground Permittivity Retrieved From L-Band Radiometry: A Retrieval Sensitivity Analysis. Ieee Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, 10, 3148-3161

Pellarin, T., Mialon, A., Biron, R., Coulaud, C., Gibon, F., Kerr, Y., Lafaysse, M., Mercier, B., Morin, S., Redor, I., Schwank, M., & Volksch, I. (2016). Three years of L-band brightness temperature measurements in a mountainous area: Topography, vegetation and snowmelt issues. Remote Sensing of Environment, 180, 85-98

Rautiainen, K., Parkkinen, T., Lemmetyinen, J., Schwank, M., Wiesmann, A., Ikonen, J., Derksen, C., Davydov, S., Davydova, A., Boike, J., Langer, M., Drusch, M., & Pulliainen, J. (2016). SMOS prototype algorithm for detecting autumn soil freezing. Remote Sensing of Environment, 180, 346-360

Ricker, R., Hendricks, S., Kaleschke, L., Tian-Kunze, X., King, J., & Haas, C. (2017). A weekly Arctic sea-ice thickness data record from merged CryoSat-2 and SMOS satellite data. Cryosphere, 11, 1607-1623

Schwank, M., Matzler, C., Wiesmann, A., Wegmuller, U., Pulliainen, J., Lemmetyinen, J., Rautiainen, K., Derksen, C., Toose, P., & Drusch, M. (2015). Snow Density and Ground Permittivity Retrieved from L-Band Radiometry: A Synthetic Analysis. Ieee Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, 8, 3833-3845

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