SPOT4 (Take5) Licence

=>
CNES and Astrium Geo (Spotimage) have agreed to distribute the SPOT4 (Take5) data with a very open license, which was just released.

 

As always with the elaboration of legal agreements, the process was rather long and complicated, but here, the result is very positive. If I understand correctly (you'd better read the document, which is the only official version), anyone can use this data with the following few conditions:

  • use must be conducted within the SPOT4 (Take5) project  framework,  to prepare for the use Sentinel-2 data.
  • the data can not be resold, even after minor changes (this is normal, as they are freely available!)
  • services can be marketed from these data, in the frame of SPOT4 (Take5) project, to prefigure the use of Sentinel-2 data.
  • users must inform the CNES of how they use the data, and address any publication using these data to olivier.hagolle% cnes.fr and sylvia.sylvander %cnes.fr.

 

The document is here: License SPOT4 (Take5)

La licence d'utilisation des données SPOT4 (Take5)

=>

Le CNES et Astrium Geo (Spotimage) se sont mis d'accord pour distribuer les données de SPOT4 (Take5) avec une licence très ouverte, qui vient d'être publiée.

Comme toujours avec les accords juridiques, le processus est plutôt long et compliqué, mais ici le résultat est très positif. Si j'ai bien compris (le plus sûr est de lire le document, c'est lui qui fait foi), n'importe qui pourra utiliser ces données à condition de respecter les conditions suivantes :

  • l'utilisation doit être menée dans le cadre du projet SPOT4(Take5), c'est à dire dans le cadre de la préparation à l'exploitation des données Sentinel-2.
  • les données ne peuvent pas être revendues, même après de légères transformations (c'est normal, puisqu'elles sont disponibles gratuitement !)
  • des services peuvent être commercialisés à partir de ces données, dans le cadre du projet SPOT4 (Take5), pour préfigurer l'utilisation de Sentinel-2
  • il faut informer le CNES de l'utilisation qui est faite des données, et adresser toute publication utilisant ces données  à olivier.hagolle%cnes.fr et sylvia.sylvander%cnes.fr

Le document est ici : License SPOT4 (Take5)

How to estimate Aerosol Optical Thickness

=>

Caution ! This post contains formulas !


Aerosols play a great role in the atmospheric effects. Aerosols are particles suspended in the atmosphere, which can be of several types: sand or dust, soot from combustion, sulfates or sea salt, surrounded by water... Their size ranges between 0.1 micron and a few microns, depending on the type of aerosol or on the air moisture. Their quantity is also extremely variable : rain can suddenly reduce their abundance (known as "aerosol optical thickness"). The abundance variations result in great variations of observable reflectances from one day to the next, and it is therefore necessary to know the quantity and type of aerosols, in order to correct their effects.

 

Unfortunately, to correct the effects of aerosols, there is no global aerosol observation network, and the only available data are local observations from the few hundred points of Aeronet network. Therefore, this network can not be used operationally to correct the satellite images over large areas.

Weather forecast models just start predicting the amounts of aerosols, based on satellite observations and modeling of sources and sinks and of the transport of aerosols by the winds, but these data do not seem to have sufficient accuracy yet to be used for the atmospheric correction of images.

 

Our atmospheric correction method, named MACCS, is therefore based on an estimate of aerosol optical depth from the images themselves. To understand how this method works, one must already understand the effects of aerosols on radiation. We have seen in this post, that the effects of diffusion can be modelled as follows (assuming the corrected gas absorption):

ρTOA = ρatm +Td ρsurf

The reflectance at the top of the atmosphere ρTOA (Top of Atmosphere) is the sum of the atmospheric reflectance  ρatm and of the surface reflectance ρsurf transmitted by the atmosphere. We seek to know the surface reflectance, but for each measurement made at the top of the atmosphere, there are three unknowns to be determined. To separate the effects of the atmosphere and surface effects, we must use other information.

 

Dark pixel method

When the image includes a surface whose surface reflectance is nearly zero, the reflectance observed at the top of the atmosphere becomes ρTOA = ρatm. We can therefore deduce the atmospheric reflectance and using a radiative transfer model, the aerosols optical thickness (AOT). Finally, knowing the AOT, we can compute the diffuse transmission, and finally calculate ρsurf. An even simpler and more approximate version of this method consists in subtracting directly the reflectance of the dark pixel (or ρatm) to the entire image (neglecting the transmission) [Chavez, 1988].

 

However, this method assumes that there is a very dark area in the image (which is not always the case), and that the reflectance of the dark surface is known. The method also assumes that the amount of aerosols is constant over the image and it neglects the effect of terrain. The results obtained by this method can be quite inaccurate. In our method (MACCS), however, we use the method of black pixel determine the maximum value of the optical thickness in the area.

 

Multi Spectral Method, called "DDV"

If you know the type of aerosols in the atmosphere, it is possible to deduce the properties of aerosols in a spectral band from the optical properties in another spectral band.

 

If there are two spectral bands, there are two measures ρsurf and three unknowns (both surface reflectance in these bands, and the amount of aerosols). An additional equation can be obtained if we know the relationship between the surface reflectance of the two bands.

 

The method named "Dark Dense Vegetation" (DDV) is based on assumptions about relationships between surface reflectances of the dense vegetation exploiting the fact that the spectrum of dense green vegetation is quite constant. The most famous version of this method is that used by NASA for MODIS project [Remer 2005]. It connects the surface reflectance in the blue and red with those in the SWIR. This provides two equations for estimating the type of aerosol optical thickness. This method works well in temperate and boreal zones, but not in arid areas where it is difficult to find the dense vegetation. Early versions used the following equations:

 

ρBlue = 0.5 ∗ ρSWIR

ρRed = 0.25 ∗ ρSWIR

 

The following versions of the MODIS DDV algorithm are a bit more complicated but follow the same principle. Our work has shown that using the equation below allows a more accurate determination of the optical thickness, for less dense vegetation cover (NDVI to a 0.2) because bare soil brown also respect this relationship.

 

ρBlue = 0.5 * ρRed

(the exact value of the coefficient is adjusted according to the spectral bands of the instrument)


This version of the  method, however, does not allow to determine the aerosol model. In the case of SPOT4 (Take5), the absence of a blue band does not allow us to use this equation, resulting in a slight loss in accuracy.

This diagram shows that the correlation between surface reflectance above vegetation is much better for the (blue, red) couple of spectral bands than for couples including using (SWIR).

 

 

 

Multi Temporal Method

In most cases, the reflectance of the land surface changes slowly over time, while the aerosol optical properties vary rapidly from one day to another. We can therefore consider what changes from one image to another (apart from special cases often linked to human intervention) is associated with aerosols, and deduce the properties of aerosols and then correct for atmospheric effects. This method is too complex to be explained in detail here, interested readers can refer to [Hagolle 2008].

 

So that surface reflectance be nearly constant from one image to another, however, it is required that images be acquired at a constant angle. Indeed, the reflectance depend on the viewing angles: this is what we call directional effects. This method therefore applies only to satellite observations obtained with constant angle. It does not apply to standard SPOT data, but this condition is true for SPOT4 (Take5) data. It also applies to Landsat Venμs and Sentinel-2.

 

Finally :

 

Validation of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from time-series of FORMOSAT-2 images, depending on the method (multi-spectral, multi-temporal, combined), compared with the measurements provided by the Aeronet network of in-situ measurements. The multi-spectral method works best on sites covered with vegetation and is much less accurate on arid sites, while the multi-temporal method performs a little worse on green sites, but much better on dry sites. The combination of the two methods retains the best of the two basic methods.

The MACCS/MAJA method, used for SPOT4 (Take5) experiment, and also for LANDSAT, VENμS and Sentinel-2 data, combines the three methods described above to obtain robust estimates of aerosol optical thickness. These methods work in many cases, but sometimes fail when the assumptions on which they are based prove to be incorrect. They generally tend to work better on vegetated areas rather than in arid areas. for now, they assume the model known aerosol and in the coming years, we will look for reliable ways to identify the type of aerosols.

 

References :
Chavez Jr, P. S. (1988). An improved dark-object subtraction technique for atmospheric scattering correction of multispectral data. Remote Sensing of Environment, 24(3), 459-479.

Remer, L. A., and Coauthors, 2005: The modis aerosol algorithm, products, and validation. J. Atmos. Sci., 62, 947–973.

Hagolle, O and co-authors, 2008. « Correction of aerosol effects on multi-temporal images acquired with constant viewing angles: Application to Formosat-2 images ». Remote sensing of environment 112 (4)

Hagolle, O.; Huc, M.; Villa Pascual, D.; Dedieu, G. A Multi-Temporal and Multi-Spectral Method to Estimate Aerosol Optical Thickness over Land, for the Atmospheric Correction of FormoSat-2, LandSat, VENμS and Sentinel-2 Images. Remote Sens. 2015, 7, 2668-2691.

Les aérosols jouent un rôle prépondérant dans les effets atmosphériques. Les aérosols sont des particules en suspension dans l'atmosphère, qui peuvent être de plusieurs types : grains de sable ou poussières, suies issues de combustion, sulfates ou sels marins entourés d'eau... Leur taille peut varier de 0.1 µm à quelques microns, en fonction du type d'aérosols ou de l'humidité de l'air. Quant à leur quantité, elle est extrêmement variable, une pluie pouvant réduire brutalement leur abondance (on parle d'"épaisseur optique d'aérosols"). Ils peuvent faire varier fortement d'un jour à l'autre les réflectances observables depuis le sommet de l'atmosphère et il est donc nécessaire de connaître leur quantité et leur type afin de pouvoir corriger leurs effets.

 

Malheureusement, pour corriger les effets des aérosols, on ne dispose pas de réseau global d'observation des aérosols, seulement d'observations locales, sur les quelques centaines de points du réseau Aeronet. Ce réseau ne peut donc pas être utilisé pour corriger opérationnellement les images de satellites sur de grandes étendues.
Des modèles météorologiques commencent à prédire les quantités d'aérosols, en se basant sur les observations de satellites et la modélisation des sources et du transport des aérosols par les vents, mais ces données ne semblent pas encore avoir une précision suffisante pour être utilisées pour la correction atmosphérique des images.

 

Notre méthode de correction atmosphérique (MACCS) repose donc sur une estimation de l'épaisseur optique des aérosols à partir des images elles-mêmes. Pour bien comprendre le fonctionnement de cette méthode, il faut déjà comprendre les effets des aérosols sur le rayonnement. On a vu, dans ce billet, que les effets de la diffusion peuvent être modélisés ainsi (on suppose l'absorption gazeuse corrigée) :

ρTOA = ρatm +Td ρsurf

La réflectance au sommet de l'atmosphère ρTOA (Top of Atmosphere) est la somme de la réflectance atmosphérique ρatm et de la réflectance de surface ρsurf transmise par l'atmosphère. On cherche à connaître la réflectance de surface, mais à chaque mesure réalisée au sommet de l'atmosphère, on a trois inconnues à déterminer. Pour séparer les effets de l'atmosphère et les effets de la surface, il faut donc utiliser d'autres informations.

 

Méthode du pixel noir

Lorsque l'image contient une surface dont la réflectance est quasi nulle, la réflectance observée au sommet de l'atmosphère devient ρTOA= ρatm. On peut donc en déduire la réflectance atmosphérique, et en utilisant un modèle de transfert radiatif, l'épaisseur optique des d'aérosols. On peut enfin en déduire la transmission diffuse, et finalement calculer ρsurf. Une version encore plus simple et plus approximative consiste à soustraire directement la réflectance du pixel sombre (soit ρatm) à toute l'image. [Chavez, 1988]

 

Cependant, cette méthode revient à supposer qu'il existe bien une surface très sombre dans l'image (ce qui n'est pas toujours le cas), et que la réflectance de cette surface sombre est connue. La méthode suppose aussi que la quantité d'aérosols est constante dans l'image et elle néglige les effets du relief. Les résultats obtenus par cette méthode peuvent donc être assez imprécis. Dans notre méthode (MACCS), nous utilisons cependant la méthode du pixel noir déterminer la valeur maximale de l'épaisseur optique dans la zone.

 

Méthode Multi Spectrale, dite "DDV"

Si on connaît le type d'aérosols présent dans l'atmosphère, il est possible de déduire les  propriétés des aérosols dans une bande spectrale, à partir des propriétés optiques dans une autre bande spectrale.

 

Si on dispose de deux bandes spectrales, on dispose de deux mesures ρsurf et de trois inconnues( les deux réflectances de surface dans ces bandes, et la quantité d'aérosols). Une équation supplémentaire peut être obtenue si on connaît la relation entre les réflectances de surface des deux bandes.

 

La méthode  méthode "Dark Dense Vegetation" (DDV ) est basée sur des hypothèses de relations entre réflectances de surface sur la végétation dense exploitant le fait que le spectre de la végétation dense et verte est un peu toujours le même. La version la plus connue de cette méthode est celle utilisée par la NASA pour le projet MODIS [Remer 2005]. Elle relie les réflectances de surface dans le bleu et dans le rouge avec celles dans le moyen infra-rouge. On dispose ainsi de deux équations qui permettent d’estimer le type d’aérosols et l’épaisseur optique. Cette méthode fonctionne bien en zones tempérées et boréales, mais pas en zones arides, où il est difficile de trouver de la végétation dense. Les premières versions utilisaient les équations suivante

ρBleu = 0.5 ∗ ρSWIR

ρRouge = 0.25 ∗ ρSWIR

Les versions suivantes ont un peu compliqué ces équations, sans en modifier le principe. Nos travaux ont montré que l’utilisation de l'équation ci dessous  (la valeur exacte du coefficient est à ajuster en fonction des bandes spectrales de l'instrument):

ρBleu = 0.5 ∗ ρRouge

permet une détermination plus précise de l’épaisseur optique, pour des couverts végétaux moins denses (jusqu’à un NDVI de 0.2), car les sols nus de couleur marron respectent aussi cette relation. La méthode ne permet pas, par contre, de déterminer le modèle d’aérosols. Dans le cas de SPOT4 (Take5) l'absence d'une bande bleue ne nous permet pas d'utiliser cette dernière équation, d’où une légère perte en précision.

Ce diagramme montre que la corrélation entre réflectances de surface au dessus de la végétation est bien meilleure pour le couple de bandes spectrales (bleu, rouge) que pour les couples incluant le moyen infra rouge. (SWIR)

 

Méthode Multi Temporelle

On observe dans la plupart des cas que les réflectances de la surface terrestre évoluent lentement avec le temps, alors que le propriétés optiques des aérosols varient très rapidement, d'un jour à l'autre. On peut donc considérer que ce qui change d'une image à l'autre (en dehors de cas particuliers souvent liées à des interventions humaines) est lié aux aérosols, et donc en déduire les propriétés des aérosols pour ensuite corriger les effets atmosphériques. Cette méthode est un peu trop complexe pour être expliquée en détails ici, les lecteurs intéressés pourront se reporter à [Hagolle 2008].

 

Pour que les réflectances de surface soient quasi constantes d'une image à l'autre, il faut cependant que les images soient acquises sous un angle de vue constant. Les changements d'angles d'observation font en effet varier les réflectances (ce phénomène sera prochainement expliqué dans un autre article). Cette méthode ne s'applique donc qu'aux seuls satellites permettant des observations à angle constant.  Elle ne s'applique donc pas aux données SPOT normales mais par contre convient parfaitement aux données SPOT4 (Take5). Elle s'appliquera aussi à Landsat, Venµs et Sentinel-2.

En résumé :

Performance de l'estimation de l'épaisseur optique des aérosols sur des séries temporelles d'images Formosat-2,, en fonction de la méthode (multi-spectrale, multi-temporelle, combinée), par comparaison avec les mesures fournies par le réseau de mesures in-situ Aeronet. La méthode multi spectrale fonctionne mieux sur des sites couverts de végétation et moins bien sur des sites arides, la méthode multi-temporelle marche un peu moins bien sur les sites verts, mais beaucoup mieux sur les sites arides. La combinaison des deux méthodes garde le meilleur des deux méthodes élémentaires.

 

Notre méthode MACCS, utilisée pour l'expérience SPOT4 (Take5), et pour les données LANDSAT, VENµS et Sentinel-2, combine les trois méthodes présentées ci-dessus pour obtenir des estimations robustes des épaisseurs optiques d'aérosols. Ces méthodes fonctionnent dans un grand nombre de cas, mais peuvent parfois échouer quand les hypothèses sur lesquelles elles reposent s'avèrent fausses. Elles ont en général tendance à mieux fonctionner sur des zones couvertes de végétation plutôt que dans des zones arides. pour le moment, elles supposent le modèle d'aérosol connu, et dans les prochaines années, nous chercherons des manières fiables d'identifier le type d'aérosols.

 

References :
Chavez Jr, P. S. (1988). An improved dark-object subtraction technique for atmospheric scattering correction of multispectral data. Remote Sensing of Environment, 24(3), 459-479.

Remer, L. A., and Coauthors, 2005: The modis aerosol algorithm, products, and validation. J. Atmos. Sci., 62, 947–973.

Hagolle, O and co-authors, 2008. « Correction of aerosol effects on multi-temporal images acquired with constant viewing angles: Application to Formosat-2 images ». Remote sensing of environment 112 (4)

L'estimation du contenu atmosphérique en aérosols

=>

Attention, cet article contient des formules !

 

Les aérosols jouent un rôle prépondérant dans les effets atmosphériques. Les aérosols sont des particules en suspension dans l'atmosphère, qui peuvent être de plusieurs types : grains de sable ou poussières, suies issues de combustion, sulfates ou sels marins entourés d'eau... Leur taille peut varier de 0.1 µm à quelques microns, en fonction du type d'aérosols ou de l'humidité de l'air. Quant à leur quantité, elle est extrêmement variable, une pluie pouvant réduire brutalement leur abondance (on parle d'"épaisseur optique d'aérosols"). Ils peuvent faire varier fortement d'un jour à l'autre les réflectances observables depuis le sommet de l'atmosphère et il est donc nécessaire de connaître leur quantité et leur type afin de pouvoir corriger leurs effets.

 

Malheureusement, pour corriger les effets des aérosols, on ne dispose pas de réseau global d'observation des aérosols, seulement d'observations locales, sur les quelques centaines de points du réseau Aeronet. Ce réseau ne peut donc pas être utilisé pour corriger opérationnellement les images de satellites sur de grandes étendues.
Des modèles météorologiques commencent à prédire les quantités d'aérosols, en se basant sur les observations de satellites et la modélisation des sources et du transport des aérosols par les vents, mais ces données ne semblent pas encore avoir une précision suffisante pour être utilisées pour la correction atmosphérique des images.

 

Notre méthode de correction atmosphérique (MACCS) repose donc sur une estimation de l'épaisseur optique des aérosols à partir des images elles-mêmes. Pour bien comprendre le fonctionnement de cette méthode, il faut déjà comprendre les effets des aérosols sur le rayonnement. On a vu, dans ce billet, que les effets de la diffusion peuvent être modélisés ainsi (on suppose l'absorption gazeuse corrigée) :

ρTOA = ρatm +Td ρsurf

La réflectance au sommet de l'atmosphère ρTOA (Top of Atmosphere) est la somme de la réflectance atmosphérique ρatm et de la réflectance de surface ρsurf transmise par l'atmosphère. On cherche à connaître la réflectance de surface, mais à chaque mesure réalisée au sommet de l'atmosphère, on a trois inconnues à déterminer. Pour séparer les effets de l'atmosphère et les effets de la surface, il faut donc utiliser d'autres informations.

 

Méthode du pixel noir

Lorsque l'image contient une surface dont la réflectance est quasi nulle, la réflectance observée au sommet de l'atmosphère devient ρTOA= ρatm. On peut donc en déduire la réflectance atmosphérique, et en utilisant un modèle de transfert radiatif, l'épaisseur optique des d'aérosols. On peut enfin en déduire la transmission diffuse, et finalement calculer ρsurf. Une version encore plus simple et plus approximative consiste à soustraire directement la réflectance du pixel sombre (soit ρatm) à toute l'image. [Chavez, 1988]

 

Cependant, cette méthode revient à supposer qu'il existe bien une surface très sombre dans l'image (ce qui n'est pas toujours le cas), et que la réflectance de cette surface sombre est connue. La méthode suppose aussi que la quantité d'aérosols est constante dans l'image et elle néglige les effets du relief. Les résultats obtenus par cette méthode peuvent donc être assez imprécis. Dans notre méthode (MACCS), nous utilisons cependant la méthode du pixel noir déterminer la valeur maximale de l'épaisseur optique dans la zone.

 

Méthode Multi Spectrale, dite "DDV"

Si on connaît le type d'aérosols présent dans l'atmosphère, il est possible de déduire les  propriétés des aérosols dans une bande spectrale, à partir des propriétés optiques dans une autre bande spectrale.

 

Si on dispose de deux bandes spectrales, on dispose de deux mesures ρsurf et de trois inconnues( les deux réflectances de surface dans ces bandes, et la quantité d'aérosols). Une équation supplémentaire peut être obtenue si on connaît la relation entre les réflectances de surface des deux bandes.

 

La méthode  méthode "Dark Dense Vegetation" (DDV ) est basée sur des hypothèses de relations entre réflectances de surface sur la végétation dense exploitant le fait que le spectre de la végétation dense et verte est un peu toujours le même. La version la plus connue de cette méthode est celle utilisée par la NASA pour le projet MODIS [Remer 2005]. Elle relie les réflectances de surface dans le bleu et dans le rouge avec celles dans le moyen infra-rouge. On dispose ainsi de deux équations qui permettent d’estimer le type d’aérosols et l’épaisseur optique. Cette méthode fonctionne bien en zones tempérées et boréales, mais pas en zones arides, où il est difficile de trouver de la végétation dense. Les premières versions utilisaient les équations suivante :

 

ρBleu = 0.5 ∗ ρSWIR

ρRouge = 0.25 ∗ ρSWIR

 

Les versions suivantes ont un peu compliqué ces équations, sans en modifier le principe. Nos travaux ont montré que l’utilisation de l'équation ci dessous  (la valeur exacte du coefficient est à ajuster en fonction des bandes spectrales de l'instrument):

ρBleu = 0.5 ∗ ρRouge

 

permet une détermination plus précise de l’épaisseur optique, pour des couverts végétaux moins denses (jusqu’à un NDVI de 0.2), car les sols nus de couleur marron respectent aussi cette relation. La méthode ne permet pas, par contre, de déterminer le modèle d’aérosols. Dans le cas de SPOT4 (Take5) l'absence d'une bande bleue ne nous permet pas d'utiliser cette dernière équation, d’où une légère perte en précision.

Ce diagramme montre que la corrélation entre réflectances de surface au dessus de la végétation est bien meilleure pour le couple de bandes spectrales (bleu, rouge) que pour les couples incluant le moyen infra rouge. (SWIR)

 

Méthode Multi Temporelle

On observe dans la plupart des cas que les réflectances de la surface terrestre évoluent lentement avec le temps, alors que le propriétés optiques des aérosols varient très rapidement, d'un jour à l'autre. On peut donc considérer que ce qui change d'une image à l'autre (en dehors de cas particuliers souvent liées à des interventions humaines) est lié aux aérosols, et donc en déduire les propriétés des aérosols pour ensuite corriger les effets atmosphériques. Cette méthode est un peu trop complexe pour être expliquée en détails ici, les lecteurs intéressés pourront se reporter à [Hagolle 2008].

 

Pour que les réflectances de surface soient quasi constantes d'une image à l'autre, il faut cependant que les images soient acquises sous un angle de vue constant. Les changements d'angles d'observation font en effet varier les réflectances : c'est ce qu'on appelle les effets directionnels. Cette méthode ne s'applique donc qu'aux seuls satellites permettant des observations à angle constant.  Elle ne s'applique donc pas aux données SPOT normales mais par contre convient parfaitement aux données SPOT4 (Take5). Elle s'appliquera aussi à Landsat, Venµs et Sentinel-2.

 

En résumé :
Performance de l'estimation de l'épaisseur optique des aérosols sur des séries temporelles d'images Formosat-2,, en fonction de la méthode (multi-spectrale, multi-temporelle, combinée), par comparaison avec les mesures fournies par le réseau de mesures in-situ Aeronet. La méthode multi spectrale fonctionne mieux sur des sites couverts de végétation et moins bien sur des sites arides, la méthode multi-temporelle marche un peu moins bien sur les sites verts, mais beaucoup mieux sur les sites arides. La combinaison des deux méthodes garde le meilleur des deux méthodes élémentaires.

 

Notre méthode MACCS, utilisée pour l'expérience SPOT4 (Take5), et pour les données LANDSAT, VENµS et Sentinel-2, combine les trois méthodes présentées ci-dessus pour obtenir des estimations robustes des épaisseurs optiques d'aérosols. Ces méthodes fonctionnent dans un grand nombre de cas, mais peuvent parfois échouer quand les hypothèses sur lesquelles elles reposent s'avèrent fausses. Elles ont en général tendance à mieux fonctionner sur des zones couvertes de végétation plutôt que dans des zones arides. pour le moment, elles supposent le modèle d'aérosol connu, et dans les prochaines années, nous chercherons des manières fiables d'identifier le type d'aérosols.

 

References :
Chavez Jr, P. S. (1988). An improved dark-object subtraction technique for atmospheric scattering correction of multispectral data. Remote Sensing of Environment, 24(3), 459-479.

Remer, L. A., and Coauthors, 2005: The modis aerosol algorithm, products, and validation. J. Atmos. Sci., 62, 947–973.

Hagolle, O and co-authors, 2008. « Correction of aerosol effects on multi-temporal images acquired with constant viewing angles: Application to Formosat-2 images ». Remote sensing of environment 112 (4)

Hagolle, O.; Huc, M.; Villa Pascual, D.; Dedieu, G. A Multi-Temporal and Multi-Spectral Method to Estimate Aerosol Optical Thickness over Land, for the Atmospheric Correction of FormoSat-2, LandSat, VENμS and Sentinel-2 Images. Remote Sens. 2015, 7, 2668-2691.

SPOT4 (Take5) after 3 months

=>

The SPOT4 (Take5) is already 3 months old and will only last for one month and a half. For the in-situ measurements among the users teams, there is also only one month left.

 

On that occasion, we just created a quicklook page that shows all the images acquired between January the 31st and April the 15th.

 

With the help of Vincent Poulain (of Thales, funded by CNES Image Quality service (thank you!)), large improvements have been made on the settings for ortho-rectification SIGMA software, in order to eliminate much of the poor correlations that disrupted our measurements. With the exception of two very uniform rainforest sites (Borneo and Sumatra), the registration performance for all sites are now excellent. Selection thresholds are however a little too strict for two other rainforest sites (Gabon and Congo), where most images are rejected. The work is going on...

 

In this April 6 to Cameroon picture, one of the rainforest sites, whose ortho-rectification was greatly enhances, small cumulus clouds are present at above the ground and not above the sea If a meteorologist passes by, an explanation of this phenomenon frequently encountered would be welcome .

Despite very bad weather in many places, especially in France early this year, SPOT4 managed to take some beautiful pictures without clouds on almost all sites. The quick-looks from images clear enough to be ortho-rectified are now available on this blog. On many of these sites (in Brittany, Alsace, Sumatra, China), it will require using partially cloudy images to obtain a correct repetitivity. You may judge for yourself that the repeatability of 5 days is absolutely necessary (in some cases even a little insufficient) to properly monitor vegetation growth.

 

On CNES side, the Take5 production center was installed on April the 30 th. The official production can start (I guess we'll have to experiment to configure all the settings). The  distribution served of the French Land Data Center is also ready. It is just waiting for the opening of its domain name (ptsc.fr), that requires a few signatures. A special data server for Take5 is also being finalized. The next weeks will be busy, but the data should be released in June as planned.
Finally, CNES and Astrium have agreed on a very liberal license for SPOT4(Take5) data, that should be issued in the coming days.

SPOT4 (Take5) : déjà trois mois écoulés

=>

 

L'expérience SPOT4 (Take5) a démarré depuis trois mois et il ne reste plus qu'un mois et demi de prises de vues, et aussi un mois et demi de collecte de données de terrain pour les équipes d'utilisateurs.

 

A cette occasion, nous avons créé une page de quicklooks fournissant toutes les images acquises jusqu'au 15 ou au 20 avril.

 

Grâce à l'aide de Vincent Poulain (de la société Thales, financé par le service SI/QI du CNES (Merci !)), de grosses améliorations ont été obtenues sur le paramètrage du logiciel d'ortho-rectification SIGMA, afin d'éliminer une bonne part des mauvaises corrélations qui perturbaient nos mesures. A l'exception de deux sites très uniformes de forêts équatoriales (Borneo et Sumatra), les performances de superposition sont maintenant excellentes. Les seuils de sélection sont cependant un peu trop sévères pour deux autres sites (Gabon et Congo), pour lesquels la plupart des images sont rejetées. Le travail se poursuit.

 

Image du 6 avril au Cameroun, l'un des sites difficiles de forêts équatoriales, dont l'ortho-rectification s'est nettement améliorée. Sur cette image, on observe que les petits cumulus ne sont présents qu'au dessus de la terre et pas au dessus de la mer. Si un météorologue passe par là, une explication de ce phénomène fréquemment rencontré serait la bienvenue.

Malgré une météo très mauvaise sur de nombreux sites, notamment en France en ce début d'année, SPOT4 a réussi à prendre quelques belles images sans nuages sur à peu près tous les sites. Les quick-looks des images suffisamment claires pour pouvoir être orthorectifiées sont maintenant disponibles sur ce blog. Sur plusieurs de ces sites (en Bretagne, en Alsace, à Sumatra, en Chine), il faudra utiliser les images partiellement nuageuses pour obtenir une répétitivité correcte. Vous pouvez juger par vous mêmes que la répétitivité de 5 jours est absolument nécessaire (dans certains cas même un peu insuffisante) pour bien suivre les évolutions de la végétation.

 

Côté CNES, le centre de production des images Take5 vient d'être installé au CNES, le 30 Avril. La production officielle peut démarrer (j'imagine que nous devrons faire plusieurs essais pour tout configurer). Le serveur de distribution des données du Pôle Thématique Surfaces Continentales est lui aussi en place, en version préliminaire. Il ne lui manque plus que l'ouverture de son nom de domaine (ptsc.fr), en attente de quelques signatures. Un serveur de données spécial pour Take5 est également en cours de finalisation. On ne va pas chômer, mais les données devraient donc sortir en Juin comme prévu.

 

Enfin, le CNES et Astrium Geo se sont mis d'accord pour une license très libérale pour les données SPOT4(Take5). Cette license sera publiée dans les jours qui viennent.

Suivi des agrosystèmes sensibles pour la préservation de la biodiversité : le cas du Grand Hamster d’Alsace, premiers résultats

Le paysage agricole alsacien constitue l’habitat du Grand Hamster, présent en France uniquement dans cette région et aujourd’hui en voie d’extinction. Le rongeur est fortement menacé par la régression des surfaces de fourrages et de céréales, les seules à lui offrir nourriture et protection lors de la période vulnérable de fin d’hibernation, remplacées par la culture intensive du maïs, à ce moment là à l’état de sol nu.

 

Dans le contexte de préservation à long terme des populations de hamster, le SERTIT réalise chaque année la cartographie de l’environnement du grand hamster à partir de données SPOT et/ou Pléiades, afin d’évaluer rapidement et de manière ciblée la qualité de l'habitat autour des noyaux de population, d’identifier les sites critiques, et d’apprécier l’efficacité des mesures existantes de protection de l’espèce.

 

Une surveillance encore plus régulière, mensuelle, voire hebdomadaire, de l’évolution du paysage serait certainement très bénéfique pour la compréhension des menaces qui pèsent sur le rongeur et l’observation des effets positifs des mesures de protection. L’intérêt est surtout de voir l’évolution des surfaces favorables au hamster, d’identifier la proportion de cultures fourragères et de céréales d’hiver par rapport aux terres nues, de détecter la précocité éventuelle de certaines cultures de printemps qui pourraient être profitable au hamster, ou de mettre en évidence un gel tardif des cultures d’hiver à l’impact très négatif puisqu’il réduirait l’espace favorable au rongeur.

 

Ainsi, les données SPOT 4 acquises sur l’Alsace dans le cadre du programme Take Five et simulant les futures données Sentinel-2 nous donnent pour la première fois l’opportunité de faire un suivi de l’évolution des cultures favorables au hamster dans un même cycle de vie du rongeur.

 

En parallèle à ces acquisitions satellites, des missions sur le terrain synchrones ou quasi-synchrones sont organisées afin de valider les observations faites à partir des données de télédétection, et cela sur une même sélection de parcelles échantillons (situées sur des sites clé pour le hamster).

 

La première acquisition exploitable a été faite le 4 mars 2013, journée durant laquelle des relevés in situ ont également été réalisés. A cette période, les hamsters sont encore dans leur phase d’hibernation, une partie des cultures d’hiver est en cours de croissance, de vastes parcelles de terre nue labourée couvrent l’espace agricole et de vieux champs de luzerne sèche sont présents.

 

L’analyse radiométrique de cette donnée SPOT 4 permet de différencier trois classes d'occupation du sol dans les parcelles échantillon : terre nue, blé et luzerne / prairie. Il est difficile de distinguer la luzerne des prairies, leurs signatures spectrales étant très proches. Les observations satellites et les relevés terrain concordent assez bien, les caractéristiques spectrales des différentes classes d’occupation du sol étant relativement bien distinctes. Nous constatons tout de même près de 23% d'erreurs, liées principalement à la détection difficile des cultures en cours de croissance trop jeunes et donc trop peu denses et de l'occupation du sol sur les parcelles trop petites / trop étroites. Une résolution plus fine des données satellites, ou une série temporelle plus longue permettrait certainement de résoudre en partie ces problèmes de détection.

 

Les observations suivantes, à condition que la météo s'arrange un peu, permettront d’approfondir ces conclusions et d’évaluer les bénéfices de la multi-temporalité des données.

 

 

There is an issue with Paris

=>

When Mireille Huc steps in my office saying "il y a un problème" (there is an issue), it is generally due to a new case that is not handled by our level 2A methods. This time, she said : "there is an issue with Paris".

 

Such issues happen regularly each time we observe a new type of Landscape. That's why it so important to process a wide range of landscapes and images to qualify our methods. Here are a few examples of the issues we encounter once in a while :

  • The very turbid Gironde estuary classified as snow, because very bright in the visible while dark in the SWIR, as for snow
  • false clouds due to drying white soils whose reflectance is increasing
  • False  Cloud Shadows after fields were irrigated in Mexico, whose reflectance decreases quickly
  • Snow in the middle of desert in South Tunisia (a dry salt lake,  bright in the visible, and dark in the SWIR)

 

This time, on this SPOT4 (Take5) time series near Versailles, the clouds are well classified, the atmospheric correction seems to work, but ... but, this zone oulined in blue in the North East Corner, it is Paris centre. It means the region is under water, but if Paris had been under water for two months, we would have known (given what they say when there is only one inch of snow). Mireille checked the data, and it turns out that Paris centre meets all the criteria we use to detect water (computed at 200m resolution):

  • NDVI <0

    SPOT4(Take5) time series near Versailles. Colour composite: (R,G,B)=(NIR, Red, Green). The clouds are circled in green, their shadow in black, and wter bodies and Paris centre in blue. Click twice on each image to see it at 40m resolution.

  • NDWI <0
  • Red Reflectance  < 0.1

 

It is the first town for which we observe this issue, maybe because of Paris huge density, of its slate roofs, and because of the winter period with no leaves on the trees.

A solution would be to process the water mask at a higher resolution (100m, 60m). Or could we just say that our "water" mask is in fact a "water and dense town centre with slate roofs" mask ? Or even better ask Parisians to grow plants on their roofs.

 

Meanwhile,  one can note on this time series that despite a repetitivity of 5 days, we only got one partially clear image in March, but this month was exceptionally cloudy, they say in Paris. The onset of vegetation can also be clearly seen on the last image of the series, after nice weather came back at the beginning of April.

 

 

 

Il y a un problème avec Paris

=>

Quand Mireille Huc entre dans mon bureau en disant "il y a un problème", c'est en général qu'un nouveau cas, non prévu dans nos méthodes, est apparu. Cette fois-ci, c'était "il y a un problème avec Paris".

 

Ce genre de cas arrive quasiment à chaque nouveau type de paysage, c'est pourquoi il est très important de valider nos méthodes dans un grand nombre de cas. Voici quelques exemples de problèmes déjà rencontrés :

  • l'estuaire de la Gironde déclaré "couvert de neige" car très brillant dans le visible, avec sa charge en sédiments, mais très sombre dans le SWIR, comme la neige
  • des faux nuages sur des sols blancs qui sèchent et dont la réflectance augmente
  • des fausses ombres après une irrigation au Mexique, et dont la réflectance diminue
  • de la neige en plein désert en Tunisie (un lac salé, brillant dans le visible, sombre dans le SWIR)

 

Cette fois-ci, sur cette série d'images SPOT4 (Take5) centrée sur Versailles, les nuages sont bien détectés, les corrections atmosphériques ont l'air correctes, mais ... mais, cette zone entourée de bleu dans le coin Nord Est, c'est Paris. Les zones soulignées en bleu sont, normalement, des étendues d'eau. Si Paris était inondée depuis deux mois, nous en aurions entendu parler (vu le bruit qu'il font quand ils ont deux centimètres de neige). Mireille a enquêté, et a observé que le centre de Paris respecte bien tous nos critères de détection de l'eau (calculés à 200 mètres de résolution) :

  • NDVI négatif

    Série d'images SPOT4(Take5) obtenues sur le site centré sur Versailles début 2013. Composition colorée: (R,V,B)=(PIR, Rouge, Vert). Les nuages sont entourés de vert, leurs ombres sont entourées de noir, les zones en eau et Paris sont entourés de bleu. Cliquer deux fois sur chaque vignette pour voir l'image à 40m de résolution.

  • NDWI négatif
  • Réflectance dans le rouge < 0.1

 

C'est la première ville pour laquelle ce problème est observé, peut-être en raison de sa grande densité, de ses toits en ardoise, et de la période hivernale avec des arbres sans feuilles. Pour le moment, nous n'avons pas encore trouvé de parade. Nous pourrons peut-être nous en sortir en traitant le masque d'eau à une meilleure résolution (100m, 60m ?). Ou en déclarant que notre "masque d'eau" est en fait un "masque d'eau et de villes denses aux toits en ardoise" ? Ou en suggérant aux Parisiens de faire pousser des plantes sur leurs toits, d'ici le lancement de Sentinel-2 ?

 

Au passage, on peut remarquer que malgré une répétitivité de 5 jours, on dispose d'une seule image partiellement claire au mois de mars, il faut dire que ce mois de mars a été particulièrement couvert. On peut aussi observer nettement le démarrage de la végétation sur la dernière image après le retour du beau temps au début du mois d'avril (les parcelles agricoles au sud-ouest de l'image deviennent plus rouges).

 

 

 

 

SPOT4 (Take 5) : As a clockwork, but no bed of roses...

=>

I have written that SPOT4 (Take 5) was working  as a clockwork, but  I have to admit that the ortho-rectification of SPOT4 images is not as easy as I thought initially.

 

This plot provides the location error along the West-East axis (x) and along the North South axis( y) for each image, with a different color for each decade, A strong bias is observed, particularly during the last decade of February and the first decade of March, for sites other Europe. This location error is corrected after the ortho-rectification.

The location error of an image is the average difference between the actual position of the pixels of an image, and the position calculated knowing the position of the satellite, its orientation (in space science, we say "attitude") , the  orientation of the mirror and the location of the detectors in the instrument. While the SPOT4 image localization performance measured at CNES, has usually a standard deviation of 450 meters, we met over a fifty scenes with localization errors greater than 1000 meters. Most of them were acquired close to Europe.

 

We have not yet an explanation for this issue, which is still within SPOT4 requirements (1500m RMS). On recent satellites,the attitude is measured very precisely by star trackers. These sensors are small optical instruments that identify  stars in the sky whose position is known to determine the attitude of the satellite, as the walker lost at night can use the North Star to find his or her way. But when SPOT 4 was designed in the early 1990s, these star trackers were not operational yet, and SPOT4 used another type of sensor, the earth sensor. This device works in the thermal infrared : it scans the horizon of the earth, and deduces the position of the center of the earth. However, its accuracy is altered by the presence or absence of high clouds that modify slightly the horizon. For this reason, earth sensors are less accurate than star trackers.

 

In short, the location of SPOT4 (Take5) images is quite poor sometimes, and when we search for a ground control point, we need to search its match in a range that reaches 2.5 kilometers. This long distance research increases the probability of matching similar neighborhoods that do not correspond in fact to the same places. Therefore, within the set of ground control points that we use for the orthorectification, we may obtain erroneous ground control points more frequently than usually. Because of that,  some images might be misregistered.

 

SPOT4(Take5) multi-temporal registration accuracy, for te images of NASA's site Maricopa, Which is observed twice every 5 days under two different angles. The accuracy is expressed for 80% of pixels. The 20% remaining measurements are considered as due to registration measurement errors. The registration is slightly better when the images are observed with the same viewing angle.

With the help of some CNES colleagues (Cécile Déchoz, Stéphane May, Sylvia Sylvander), I have spent the last month tuning a parameter set that would minimize the amount of false GCP's by selecting them carefully, without removing too many of the good ones, in order to be able to ortho-rectify images with a large cloud cover. Results are now enhancing, but once in a while, misregistered images are still encountered.

 

Same plot for JRC's site in Tanzania. This site is much more cloudy than Maricopa, but the performance is equivalent.

Finally, in most of the cases, the registration of Take5 data should be quite good, with most of the pixels within 0.5 pixel accuracy, but some images may have higher errors. The ortho-retification diagnostics enable us to detect these cases, as in the image below, but the images will not be delivered at Level 1C.

Kind of image (Sumatra) for which the registration error is higher. The cloud cover is high, the surface is quite uniform, and the LANDSAT reference image itself is quite cloudy.